Faces of Egypt

Pharaoh Amenhotep II

Pharaoh Amenhotep II

Amenhotep II (sometimes called Amenophis II and meaning Amun is Satisfied) was the seventh Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt. Amenhotep inherited a vast kingdom from his father Thutmose III, and held it by means of a few military campaigns in Syria.

Cleopatra

Cleopatra

Like most monarchs of her time, Cleopatra saw herself as divine; from birth she and other members of her family were declared to be gods and goddesses. Highly image-conscious, Cleopatra maintained her mystique through shows of splendor, identifying herself with the deities Isis and Aphrodite, and in effect creating much of the mythology that surrounds her to this day.

God Ptah

God Ptah

In Egyptian mythology, Ptah is the demiurge of Memphis, god of craftsmen and architects. Ptah is generally represented in the guise of a man with green skin, contained in a shroud sticking to the skin, wearing the divine beard, and holding a sceptre combining three powerful symbols of ancient Egyptian religion the Was (scepter), the Ankh (sign of life) and the Djed (pillar) Ptah was the husband of Sekhmet (lioness) and the father of Nefertum of the blue lotus flower and the sage Imhotep.

Amenhotep

Amenhotep

Egyptian sculpture, 15-13th BC bust of Amenhotep (1440-1360 BC), Son of Hapu, scribe and sage of the time of Amenhotep III (1411-1375 BCE). Black granite figure from Karnak, Egypt. New Kingdom (18th dynasty). Height: 130 cm See also 08-01-03/8 He was high official of the reign of Amenhotep III of Egypt, who was greatly honored by the king within his lifetime and was deified more than 1,000 years later during the Ptolemaic era.

Ka-Aper 4th Dynasty

Ka-Aper 4th Dynasty

Portrait statue of Ka-Aper, from his mastaba (tomb) at Saqqara, Egypt, Fifth Dynasty, ca. 2450-2350 BCE. The carving is wood with rock crystal eyes.

Tiye

Tiye

Tiye (c. 1398 BC – 1338 BC, also spelled Taia, Tiy and Tiyi) was the daughter of Yuya and Tjuyu. She became the Great Royal Wife of the Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep III. She was the mother of Akhenaten and grandmother of Tutankhamun. Her mummy was identified as "The Elder Lady" found in the tomb of Amenhotep II (KV35) in 2010.

Akhenaten

Akhenaten

Akhenaten (aka Akhenaton) is one of Ancient Egypt's most controversial and notable pharaohs. He ruled for 17 years during the 18th Dynasty and came to be known by some fascinating names, including Great Heretic, The Heretic Pharaoh, and Rebel Pharaoh. Originally, he was known as Amenhotep IV, but then changed his name to reflect his link with the new supreme deity, whom he worshiped.

Imhotep

Imhotep

This ancient Egyptian having a wide variety of knowledge, excelled in various fields of activity, especially engineering and architecture. He is credited for designing the Pyramid of Djoser. Imhotep had many contributions in the field of engineering, inventions that defined the way Egyptians, and many other cultures after that built any sort of structures. Despite being born a commoner, Imhotep achieved ‘divine’ status at the moment of his death.

King Djoser

King Djoser

Djoser, also spelled Zoser, second king of the 3rd dynasty (c. 2650–c. 2575 BCE) of ancient Egypt, who undertook the construction of the earliest important stone building in Egypt. His reign, which probably lasted 19 years, was marked by great technological innovation in the use of stone architecture. His minister, Imhotep, a talented architect and physician, was himself deified in later periods.

Nefertari

Nefertari

Her name, Nefertari Merytmut (meaning The Beautiful Companion, Beloved of Mut), embodied the majesty and stature of queen Nefertari. At the young age of 13 she married the 15 year old Ramses II, who would come to be famously known as Ramses the Great.

Sobek Relief

Sobek Relief

The people of ancient Egypt worshiped crocodiles while both loving and fearing them. They were a symbol of power, virility and fertility. As the Crocodile God, Sobek protected the Egyptian army, the pharaohs, and the ancient Egyptian people.

Baset

Baset

Bastet, also called Bast, ancient Egyptian goddess worshipped in the form of a lioness and later a cat. The daughter of Re, the sun god, Bastet was an ancient deity whose ferocious nature was ameliorated after the domestication of the cat around 1500 BCE.

Hathor

Hathor

Hathor is an Ancient Egyptian goddess who personified the principles of love, beauty, music, dance, motherhood and joy. She was one of the most important and popular deities throughout the history of Ancient Egypt

Queen Nefertiti

Queen Nefertiti

Nefertiti was the chief consort of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten (formerly Amenhotep IV), who reigned from approximately 1353 to 1336 BC. Known as the Ruler of the Nile and Daughter of Gods , Nefertiti acquired unprecedented power, and is believed to have held equal status to the pharaoh himself.

Osiris Metal Statue

Osiris Metal Statue

Osiris is the Egyptian Lord of the Underworld and Judge of the Dead, brother-husband to Isis, and one of the most important gods of ancient Egypt.

Sekhmet

Sekhmet

Sekhmet was a lion goddess whose name means "the mighty one." She personified the aggressive aspects of other goddesses. Sekhmet was a daughter of the sun-god Ra and usually depicted with the sun-disc on her head.

Osiris

Osiris

Images of Osiris as a living god depict him as a handsome man in royal dress wearing the crown of Upper Egypt as a plumed headdress known as the atef and carrying the crook and flail, symbols of kingship.

Ahhotep

Ahhotep

Queen Ahhotep I was the daughter of Queen Tetisheri, the wife of her brother Seqenenre Taa II, and the mother of Ahmose I and Queen Ahmose Nefertari.

Fayum Mummy Portrait

Fayum Mummy Portrait

Any of the funerary portraits dating from the Roman period 1st to 4th Century found in Egyptian tombs throughout Egypt but particularly at the oasis of al-Fayyūm. The portraits are painted in tempera or in pigments mixed with liquid beeswax.

Thutmose III

Thutmose III

King Thutmose III was a skilled warrior who brought the Egyptian empire to the zenith of its power by conquering all of Syria, crossing the Euphrates to defeat the Mitannians and penetrating south along the Nile River to Napata in the Sudan.

Horus

Horus

A god in the form of a falcon in ancient Egyptian religion, whose right eye was the sun or morning star, representing power and embodiment and whose left eye was the moon or evening star, representing healing.

Tutankhamun

Tutankhamun

Tutankhamun is the most famous and instantly recognizable pharaoh in the modern world. His golden sarcophagus is now a symbol almost synonymous with Egypt. His name means `living image of [the god] Amun.

The Great Sphinx

The Great Sphinx

The Great Sphinx of Giza is the most instantly recognizable statue associated with ancient Egypt and among the most famous in the world. The sculpture, of a recumbent lion with the head of an Egyptian king, was carved out of limestone on the Giza plateau probably in the reign of the king Khafre.

Rameses II

Rameses II

Rameses II lived to age 95 and had his name and accomplishments inscribed from one end of Egypt to the other and there is virtually no ancient site in Egypt which does not make mention of Ramesses the Great.

Thoth

Thoth

A god of the moon, reckoning, learning and writing. He was held to be the inventor of writing, the creator of languages, the scribe, interpreter, and adviser of the gods, and the representative of the sun god, Ra.

Hatshepsut

Hatshepsut

Hatshepsut, Queen of Egypt reigned in her own right for fifteen years. She attained unprecedented power, adopting the full titles and regalia of a pharaoh.

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